What is the Difference Between Omeprazole and Lansoprazole?

If you suffer from acid reflux and heartburn you’ve probably heard of omeprazole and lansoprazole.

But how do they differ and what exactly do they do? In this blog, we’ll examine the difference between Lansoprazole vs Omeprazole, how they differ and what they do.

We’re here to provide you with the lowdown on both of these medicines including their uses and how they work.

pharmacist reaching for medication

What are Lansoprazole and Omeprazole?

Omeprazole and lansoprazole are both classed as a proton pump inhibitor (PPI).1

You may be more familiar with omeprazole as it’s more commonly prescribed as a gastrointestinal medication than lansoprazole.2

Both reduce the amount of acid the stomach makes.3/4

 

What are omeprazole and lansoprazole used to treat?

Omeprazole and lansoprazole are used for the short-term treatment of acid reflux, heartburn, indigestion and symptoms of gastro-oesophageal reflux disease (GORD). 3/4 If you think you may be suffering from GORD, seek the advice of a GP for a diagnosis.

Pyrocalm Control: Over the counter omeprazole

How does a proton pump inhibiter work?

Proton pumps are enzymes in the lining of the stomach.4

They help the stomach to make the acid needed to digest food but for some people, it can irritate the stomach and cause discomfort. Acid reflux is caused by acid travelling up into the oesophagus which causes the pain of heartburn.5

PPIs work by reducing the amount of acid the stomach makes by preventing the proton pumps from working properly.4

This reduces the pain and discomfort in the stomach or the chest caused by acid reflux.

Lansoprazole vs Omeprazole Comparison

Here are a few facts and insights into the differences between omeprazole and lansoprazole.

Omeprazole

  • Comes as capsules, gastro-resistant tablets and as a liquid.4
  • Omeprazole 20mg tablets are available to buy from pharmacies and supermarkets. Capsules are only available on prescription.4
  • It can be taken by pregnant and breastfeeding women aged 18 and over. Omeprazole may be recommended by doctors if lifestyle changes such as eating smaller meals more often and avoiding fatty and spicy foods do not work.6
  • It’s usually recommended to take omeprazole once a day, in the morning.4
  • Omeprazole usually starts to work when taken on two to three consecutive days, but it may take up to four weeks for it to work fully.4
  • It can be used short term to treat symptoms only when they appear.4
  • If you buy omeprazole from a pharmacy or supermarket to treat yourself, do not take it for longer than two weeks without checking with a doctor.4
  • It’s best to avoid alcohol while you’re taking omeprazole as alcohol can increase acid production and make symptoms worse.4

Lansoprazole

  • Comes in capsules and gastro-resistant tablet form.3
  • It’s only available on prescription and the usual dose to treat indigestion and acid reflux is prescibed as Lansoprazole 15mg or
  • Lansoprazole 30mg gastro-resistent tablets.3
  • Lansoprazole isn’t usually recommended for pregnant women as there’s little safety information available about its use during pregnancy.3
  • The usual recommendation is to take lansoprazole first thing in the morning, once a day
  • Lansoprazole should start to work in two to three days, but it may take up to four weeks for it to fully control acid symptoms.3
  • How long you take it for depends on the condition, varying from a few weeks or months, sometimes even many years.3
  • It can be used as a short-term treatment, only taking when symptoms appear, but it’s best to discuss with a doctor as this isn’t suitable for everyone.3

Effectiveness of Lansoprazole vs Omeprazole

Plenty of studies have been carried out to evaluate the clinical effectiveness of omeprazole compared to lansoprazole across a range of different gastric conditions.

Some conclude there is no significant difference.

You can take omeprazole with over-the-counter antacids if you need to – always read the product patient information leaflet before using medication and speak to a pharmacist or doctor if you need more advice.9

It’s not recommended to take antacids with lansoprazole as it can decrease its effectiveness. If you do need to use an antacid, you’re advised to wait two hours after taking lansoprazole.8

Food can stop some lansoprazole from getting into your system so it’s recommended it’s taken at least 30 minutes before eating.3

Side effects of Lansoprazole and Omeprazole

Common side effects of omeprazole (may happen in more than one in 100 people):4

 

  • Headaches
  • Feeling sick
  • Being sick or diarrhoea
  • Stomach pain
  • Constipation
  • Flatulence

You can find advice on how to help these side effects on the NHS website – speak to a doctor or pharmacist for advice if you need to. To see the full list of side effects read the product patient information leaflet.

 

Common side effects of lansoprazole (may happen in more than one in 100 people):3

 

  • Headaches
  • Feeling sick
  • Being sick or diarrhoea
  • Stomach pain
  • Constipation
  • Wind
  • Itchy skin rashes
  • Feeling dizzy or tired
  • Dry mouth or throat

Speak to your doctor or pharmacist if you need help and advice. To see the full list of side effects read the product patient information leaflet.

Can you buy omeprazole over the counter?

20mg omeprazole tablets can be bought over the counter at pharmacies, supermarkets and other high street stores but can only be taken by adults.10

They are the same as the omeprazole tablets you get on prescription and can be taken for 14 days.10

You should speak to your doctor if your symptoms haven’t improved.10

Omeprazole and lansoprazole have been used to treat acid reflux and heartburn since the 1990s and are common medications.11

Side effects are fairly rare.11

In just Western Europe alone, 5% of people take them to reduce acid-related symptoms.11

It’s best to seek advice from a pharmacist and if lifestyle changes aren’t helping your heartburn and you experience symptoms on most days for three weeks or more, speak to your doctor.1

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Pyrocalm Control® 20mg Gastro-Resistant Tablets. For the short-term treatment of reflux symptoms in adults.
Contains 20 mg Omeprazole. Always read the label. Medicines can affect the unborn baby.
Always talk to your doctor or pharmacist before taking any medicine in pregnancy.

Pyrocalm